4 Tips To Clicking Awesome Baby Photos!

March 30, 2015 at 6:01 am

Taking photos of your little one is more like an art form and adventure than anything else. Capture all the giggles, smiles, tears, and everything in between with these 5 simple tips that we’ve put together just for you:

  • Don’t be afraid to get silly: Keeping the attention of a baby during a photo shoot is definitely a task. The trick is not being afraid to get silly – use puppets, a favorite toy and even crazy sounds.

 

Be Silly: The more you

Be Silly: The more you let go and enjoy yourself, the better your photo will be!

 

  • Fast Shutter Speed: Babies are always on the go! You are lucky if they will slow down long enough to get a kiss in – that is why it is always important to increase your shutter speed to freeze them midway through their actions. The faster your camera is, the quicker you can grab that perfect shot.
  • Everything is better in multiples: We all know babies aren’t always the model photography subjects. They tend to do everything besides what you need them to. To help offset those not so glamorous shots take more than one photo at a time – then you can look through it later to grab ‘The One’.

 

Click away! Click as many photos as possible.

Click away: Click as many photos as possible. This photo is a combination of a fast shutter speed and the camera ‘Burst mode’. Phew!

 

  • Shoot through the imperfect moments: Babies don’t always throw tantrums, but when they do they are pretty epic. Regardless the mood, or unplanned moments capture them all! There will always be a beautiful shot among all the chaos.

No matter the difficulties photographing your baby may bring, there is nothing more beautiful than an amazing photo to record those little moments you’ll want to remember tomorrow and hold onto forever.

Now go on, grab a camera and get creative – you’ll thank yourself in the end.

 

 


What tips have helped you photograph your little one? We’d love to know.

ZoomIn’s Guide to Low Light Photography

October 11, 2013 at 7:58 am

The festive season is here! Time to celebrate with lots of dancing, fireworks and music! Naturally these are moments that you want to capture and cherish. However sometimes capturing these moments in the dark can be a bit difficult. In the spirit of the festive season, we wanted to share three quick tips to capture your moments, even if the moments are poorly lit.

1. Increase ISO, decrease aperture: Increase the ISO and you will be able to shoot better in low light conditions. At the same time also decrease the aperture to allow more light to come into the camera as this will result in a brighter photo.

2. Try not to use the flash: Use the light from the surroundings to your advantage. This way you’ll get a more “natural photo”. Stand close to the source of light to ensure that your subject is well lit up. You can use the flash if you want to highlight a single element of your photo.

 

Avoid using the flash

Avoid using the flash: Notice how the photo has been captured without using a flash and still stands out. Photo courtesy www.sulekha.com

3. Stability: The more stable your camera is the the more sharper your photos will be! Tripods and monopods come in very handy in such cases.

Hope these tips help you click better photos during the night!

ZoomIn’s Guide to Portrait Photography – Part III

May 26, 2013 at 11:52 pm

We’re back with the final post of our 3 part guide on how to click great portrait photos (In Part I   we covered Composition and in Part II we covered Light and Background)  In this last post, we will cover the importance of ‘Posing’ and the ‘Mood’ of your photo…

Pose: It would help sometimes to get your subject to pose for you. And by pose, I don’t mean your run off the mill “say cheese” pose. There’s a way in which you can get the best out of your subject and here’s how to do it:

Tilt the body/head: A slight tilt of the head or tilt of the body, depending on how much of the subject you have chosen to capture in your shot, will always bring about interest. It creates a rather different approach to the photo than the same age old ‘head-held-straight-and-smiling’ pose.

Look away: Sometimes not looking directly into the camera is also a good option. Get your subject  to look away in another direction and leave enough space towards that particular direction while composing your photo. This will generate a lot of curiosity in terms of what the subject is looking at or is looking towards.

 

Posing: A slight tilt of the head will always bring about some interest.

Posing: A slight tilt of the head will always bring about some interest.

 

Mood: Finally, most portrait photos will carry a ‘mood’ along with them. It could be a happy mood if your subject is all smiles, a ‘thoughtful’ mood if the subject is shown sitting and pondering about something, an ‘informational’ mood if your subject is reading a newspaper, so on and so forth. It is extremely important that the mood of the photo is conveyed through the click, because this is exactly what will make the viewer think “Wow, that’s a really nice photo!”

 

Mood: Most portrait photos will communicate a mood through them. This one expresses mischief.

Mood: Most portrait photos will communicate a mood through them. This one expresses mischief.

 

There you go! Now you’re all  geared up and ready to take a go at portrait photos. Happy clicking and do share your thoughts along the way!

ZoomIn’s guide to Portrait Photography – Part II

May 16, 2013 at 6:23 am

We’re back with the 2nd part to our guide on how to click great portrait photos! While part 1 covered Composition, in this part I’ll cover the importance of Light and Background. Here goes…

Light: Light plays a crucial role in photography. A few things to bear in mind before you push the shutter button:

  • Natural light: As with all other forms of photography, natural light is the best form under which a photo can be captured. Ensuring that there is plenty of light on your subject will reduce the chances of grains, which in turn will get you a  clean and crisp photo.
  • Sunrise/Sunset: The different timings of the day and corresponding type of light do help to add a unique look to your photo. The early morning sun can provide a very fresh and crisp feeling to the photo and the evening setting sun can bring about a dramatic and dreamy feel to the photo.
  • Flash: Every photographer’s enemy – The Flash. Most people complain about how the use of flash white washes their photo completely or how it ruins the artificial light that they try to capture. However if mastered, not only will you use this right, but you can also manipulate it to get the desired results. Nowadays, on more advanced point and shoot cameras and DSLR’s, the flash settings can be manually set. The intensity of the flash can be adjusted to your taste so as to not over expose the subject’s skin completely. Explore this option in your camera settings. You’ll be surprised with what the results look like!

 

Clicking a photo during the sunset can have quite an impactful output!

Light: Clicking a photo during the sunset can have quite an impactful output!

 

Background: When it comes to portrait photography and the background, there’s one and only one tip that I have for you – keep it clean. The cleaner and more distant your background is from your subject, the lesser the distractions. This way, the only point of interest in your photo would be your subject. Just make sure that the color of the background and the subject isn’t too similar as this would blend the subject into the background.

Sometimes a contrast in terms of the background can help as well. Having a brightly lit background and keeping your subject a little darker can provide a striking effect – or doing it the other way around can help too! This will surely make your subject stand out in the photo.

Background: A brightly lit background and a darker subject can create a contrasting, yet impressive effect!

Background: A brightly lit background and a darker subject can create a contrasting, yet impressive effect!

 

Well that’s it for now. Keep a check for the third and final part of this post which will cover the ‘Pose’ and ‘Mood’ factor of portrait photos.

ZoomIn’s Guide to Travel Photography

February 20, 2013 at 10:45 pm

You’re going on vacation…how do you make sure you capture the pictures to represent the holiday? How do you shoot a perfect collection of photos that will make you remember your holiday for years to come?


Don’t shy away from the shot.
Once you’re back from your vacation, it’s your photos that will do the talking for you. A few years down the line, all the memories will reflect through the photos that you’ve clicked, so make sure that you’ve captured enough from your trip to take back with you.

Also, while it would be intimidating, try not to get carried away with the locations/structures around you. There’s a whole lot more to capture out there! Keep your eyes open and let your mind run free. We suggest:

  • Don’t be afraid to push the shutter button – Click first, sort later.
  • Get different angles – Don’t click that same old monument in that same old angle. Try a new one. You don’t want to return home with photos that look like postcards.
  • Frame your shot…multiple times! – Same subject, different frame. Try it; you never know the output till you don’t see it!
  • Click candid photos – Remember, each photo has its own tale to tell.
Get different angles

Get different angles – The famous ‘Burj Al Arab’ hotel at Dubai shot from a lesser known area.

 

Shoot locals. What they do, what their activities are, what they wear, the way their markets are spread out, their temples, their everyday grocery shopping routine…capture it all! You’ll be surprised at how much you can get out of capturing everyday basic activities. Remember – You’re the tourist, not them!

Shoot locals!

Shoot locals – The simplest of activities will look incredibly engaging.


Be familiar with customs.
Look before you leap! Do some basic research before you go clicking like crazy. Is it okay to take a picture of a Buddha statue? Is it ok to take pictures inside a temple? Be aware of restrictions and be respectful of the culture.


Shoot those signs/maps.
You’ll be surprised how helpful these references are when you get around to sharing your photos. Signs and maps will help you recall your day’s event and also identify the images you just captured. So instead of calling it “That beautiful cave” you can actually rewind back to the sign and caption the photo as “Elegant Ellora – Cave No. 17“.

Also, the shot of a road map will never go waste for obvious reasons….

Shoot those maps - It always helps to have a shot handy of the map explaining the route you're on.

Shoot those maps – It always helps to have a shot handy of the map explaining the route you’re on…for obvious reasons!


Be comfortable.
Strike the right balance! Don’t carry any “extra luggage” around while you’re out on your feet – take only what’s absolutely necessary. Extra items will only mean extra weight which might make you uncomfortable. Remember: A light traveler is a happy traveler.

We’ve come up with a list of essentials that you can’t leave home without!

Spare storage – Since most cameras are around 14-16 megapixels these days, the output of each jpeg is nothing less than 3-5 MB per photo. A standard 4 GB SD Card could possibly be problematic, especially if you’re going to be recording HD videos. We reckon a 16 GB card (class 6 or above if you’re going to be recording videos in Full HD) should do the trick.

Spare batteries – The last thing you want is to be waiting for that perfect shot and suddenly your camera refuses to respond. And ‘oh the sorrow’ when you realize you’ve run out of power! We recommend carrying a spare set of batteries with you at all times. If a spare set of batteries isn’t a viable option, it’s best to carry your charger on you. You can then take a break from your day and recharge yourself and your cameras battery at the nearest cafe!

Comfortable pouch – You’ll be walking with the camera on your shoulder/waist all day long. Ensure that the pouch you carry around on you is comforting and doesn’t make you feel uneasy at any point in time. Sometimes, the free manufacturer bags/cases/pouches just don’t cut it. Carry a pouch in which you can fit an extra card, a soft cloth with which you can clean your lens, your battery charger, etc. (Or for the DSLR consider a camera strap which gives the mobility to shoot swiftly without any hassle).

Hope these simple yet powerful tips help you take your photos to the next level!